Tag Archives: bias

Research concepts: From sample to population

In doing research, we apply the scientific method to answer questions. For example, does cigarette smoking cause lung cancer? What are the mechanisms of weakness after stroke? Why do cells become cancerous? What properties are specific to the poison of South American tree frogs? We want to understand all the individuals being studied (i.e. people, cells, frogs, etc.) but it

Read more

Indirect evidence of reporting bias in a survey of medical research studies

Reporting bias (ie. bias arising when dissemination of research findings is influenced by the results) is thought to be common in biomedical and medical research. However, exactly how common it is has been difficult to quantify. Albarqouni and colleagues examined how commonly reporting bias occurs by examining the distribution of p values in medical research studies, and compared these distributions

Read more

Cultural factors contribute to poor reproducibility in the biomedical sciences

In two previous post (1, 2), I highlighted a symposium that was held to improve the reproducibility of biomedical research. The published report includes a discussion on cultural factors that have contributed to the high prevalence of irreproducible research. Culture and nature of science Whether or not the questionable research practices described in the previous post are the result of

Read more

The difference between allocation concealment and blinding in randomised controlled trials

Allocation concealment and blinding are characteristics that prevent bias in randomised controlled trials and experimental studies. However, these concepts are often confused. Using a randomised controlled trial as an example, the statistician Philip Sedgwick explains the differences between allocation concealment and blinding, and why these characteristics are important: Researchers investigated whether a nutritious meal and food packages was more effective

Read more
« Older Entries